Chapter 9, Note 83 (pages 197 and 270)

In the years following the recognition and reservation allotment, the struggles of securing food and clothing (especially in winter), establishing successful agriculture, and aiding or enrolling related non-reservation Crees, Chippewas, and Métis, made for many battles, and Native leaders continued to seek support from trusted allies. (p. 197) Chapter 9, …

Chapter 10, Note 31 (pages 205 and 273)

First, landowners, real estate developers, and others cited perceived threats to their land values or business interests, anti-Yaqui prejudices based on sociocultural stereotypes or their foreign origins, and claims that they were not “real” Indians. Hiding behind a pseudonym, one objector exclaimed, “To place the Yaqui Indians out there would …

Chapter 10, Note 40 (pages 207 and 274)

This had facilitated the building of extensive infrastructure at New Pascua, including roads, a central plaza, water and electrical lines, eighteen completed houses, two community center buildings, five temporary homes for transient use, six more houses nearly completed, and twenty-three in various lesser stages of construction. Many lauded the progress, …

Chapter 10, Note 58 (pages 212 and 275)

Officials from the Tucson Indian Center, San Carlos Apache Nation, Colorado River Indian Tribes, and Tucson MAYO organization (Mexican-Americans, Yaquis and Others), likewise expressed opposition. (p. 212) Chapter 10, Note 58 . . . for excerpts from these sources on Arizona Native opposition. (p. 275)   Resolutions from the aforementioned …

Chapter 10, Note 64 (pages 213 and 276)

In the interlude, Spicer and the PYA pushed the recognition campaign along different lines, testifying before the American Indian Policy Review Commission’s hearing on unrecognized and terminated tribes. During this process, Spicer’s extensive research honed and strengthened the cause’s arguments for federal recognition. (p. 213) Chapter 10, Note 64 . …

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