Chapter 7, Note 18 (pages 146 and 255)

A subsequent “pacification” campaign involved twenty thousand Mexican troops, airplane bombings of Yaqui strongholds, deportation of Yaqui insurgents (to  Mexico City, Mérida, Veracruz, and Tlaxcala), and an oppressive Mexican army occupation of Yaqui territory. (pp. 145-146)

Chapter 7, Note 18 . . . for sources and discussion of US reports on the new conflict. (p. 255)

 

A subsequent pacification campaign involved 20,000 Mexican troops, airplane bombings of Yaqui strongholds, deportations of Yaqui insurgents to Mexico City, Mérida, Veracruz and Tlaxcala, and an oppressive Mexican army occupation of Yaqui territory. Previous to the 1926 deportations, fears had been expressed that the renewed Yaqui-Mexico violence might lead to a new Yucatan deportation program. Thankfully, a second iteration of full deportation and Yucatan enslavement did not follow.  

 

Sources:

  • Edward Spicer, The Yaquis: A Cultural History (Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1980), 235.
  • “Yaqui Chieftain Prisoner,” Arizona Daily Star (Tucson), January 3, 1927, 1
  • “Yaquis Demand Garrison Yeild [sic] Before Sunday,” Arizona Daily Star, May 12, 1927
  • “Yaquis Raiding in Center of Sonora,” Arizona Daily Star, June 4, 1927
  • “Yaquis Returning to Old Stronghold,” Arizona Daily Star, August 25, 1927.
  • “Yaqui Indians, Once Strong Tribe, Practically Reduced to Slavery,” Columbia Evening Missourian, May 31, 1922, 5.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *