Chapter 7, Note 75 (pages 160 and 258)

The earliest reports of these stem from the Guadalupe village south of Tempe, but the practices of Tucson-based Yaquis dominated later press. (p. 160)

Chapter 7, Note 75 . . . for sources and discussion of subsequent reports of Yaqui celebrations in Guadalupe as well as earlier Salt RiverValley–based Yaqui dancers. (p. 160)

 

Though clearly part of a separate phenomenon of Yaqui mobility, a Phoenix entrepreneur brought Yaqui dancers from Nogales to the California State Midwinter Fair in San Francisco in 1893-1894. Their dances were featured prominently as well as an exhibit of a Yaqui village. The Yaqui-Mayo folk saint Teresa Urrea, who had been exiled from Sonora to Tumacácori, was also in attendance.

 

Sources:

  • “The Toil of It,” San Francisco Call, July 18, 1893, 8.
  • “The Midwinter Fair,” Salt Lake Herald, November 23, 1893, 6.
  • “Death of a Centenarian from Arizona: Venerated by the Yaquis,” San Francisco Call, March 23, 1894, 4.
  • “Yaqui Colony Celebrate in Tempe,” Tombstone Epitaph, April 18, 1909, 3.
  • “San Francisco Day at Guadalupe Village,” Arizona Republican, October 5, 1909, 9.
  • “Yaqui Dance,” Arizona Republican, August 18, 1911, 7.
  • “Annual Yaqui Dance Attract Big Crowd,” Arizona Republican, April 8, 1912, 2.
  • “Annual Yaqui Dance,” Arizona Republican, March 21, 1913, 9.
  • “Indian Day in Tempe,” Arizona Republican, April 4, 1915, 8.
  • “Yaqui Dance Will Occur on Saturday,” Arizona Repblican, April 6, 1917, 7.
  • “Yaqui Dance to be Held November 8th,” Bisbee Daily Review, October 30, 1919, 2.
  • Arizona Republican, January 26, 1920, 4.

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