Chapter 1, Note 39 (pages 34 and 229)

By that time, they served the predominately Pima and Papago (O’Odham) mission as the craftsmen supervisors, helping other Native groups learn “civilized” trades (p. 34) …for sources and discussion of concurrent tensions between Yaquis and Spanish in the region (p. 229) Not all Yaqui-mission relations were so cordial during this …

Chapter 3, Note 35 (pages 59 and 235)

Turner’s use of the word “extermination” would have considerable contemporary and lasting influence. (p. 59) …for additional sources and discussion of the framing of Yaqui in history in terms of genocide, extermination, et cetera. (p. 235)   Comparative genocide studies are complex, and application of the word “genocide” is not …

Chapter 3, Note 82 (pages 67 and 237)

Working against them, however, were the never-ending warfare and threats to Americans’ economic interests in Sonora. (p. 67) …for sample reports of Yaqui-Mexico warfare that circulated throughout the United States and Arizona. (p. 237)   This looming chaos – regular publicizing of never-ending warfare, intermittent declarations of peace quickly broken …

Chapter 7, Note 18 (pages 146 and 255)

A subsequent “pacification” campaign involved twenty thousand Mexican troops, airplane bombings of Yaqui strongholds, deportation of Yaqui insurgents (to  Mexico City, Mérida, Veracruz, and Tlaxcala), and an oppressive Mexican army occupation of Yaqui territory. (pp. 145-146) Chapter 7, Note 18 . . . for sources and discussion of US reports …

Chapter 7, Note 80 (pages 161 and 259)

However, Yaqui dances were usually exoticized by the mass media, and the dances’ “foreign” origins were referenced. Indeed, most newspaper reports  concerning anything Yaqui-related made note of Yaquis’ origins outside the United States. (p. 161) Chapter 7, Note 80 . . . Occasional pieces in the Arizona press described museum …

Chapter 10, Note 31 (pages 205 and 273)

First, landowners, real estate developers, and others cited perceived threats to their land values or business interests, anti-Yaqui prejudices based on sociocultural stereotypes or their foreign origins, and claims that they were not “real” Indians. Hiding behind a pseudonym, one objector exclaimed, “To place the Yaqui Indians out there would …